DeliDahlias plants. Clockwise from top left: Black Jack, Fantastic, Hoamataland and Kennedy

This week my edible dahlia plants have arrived from Lubera, which is good timing as James Wong was talking about them in the Guardian last weekend: One of your five a dahlia.

Perhaps their rising popularity is because edible flowers are flavour of the month.

But do they contribute to the flavour of the dish, or are they just pretty decorations to be unceremoniously pushed to the side of the plate?
The jury may still be out on that one….

And speaking of plants that aren’t always considered food, Forage London want us to see the joy of stinging nettles and The Backyard Larder has been making Tofu Stir-fry with Horseradish Greens.

Meanwhile, Paul Barney from Edulis has been investigating alliums for all seasons, discussing 3 edible and ornamental plants that have a lot to add to the garden.

Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs bargain

Across the pond, Savor the Southwest has been blending Epazote and Garden Herbs Into Delicious Mole Verde. At the other end of the spectrum, Awkward Botany has finding that

Plants that are otherwise perfectly edible can still find a way to kill you
in Diospyrobezoars, or Persimmons Are Trying to Kill You – an article that will be fascinating to anyone whose experience with bezoars is limited to Harry Potter!

Of more practical use is the Herbal Academy’s article on how to stay cool using herbs and this guide to Foraging, Drying + Eating Seaweed in Australia.

Our last link today is from Kew, who are appealing for help to solve the mystery of the 2,000 year-old medicinal plant, crowdfunding pioneering research into Aloe vera, a commonly used ingredient.

How did this species go from a wild plant to a natural product superstar?

That’s all from Tendrils, this week’s round up of fascinating stuff about plants on the internet. If you like it, why not share it? There’s bound to be more plantaholics out there needing a fix 😉 Have a good weekend, everybody!




This blog post was written by Emma Cooper and was published on The Unconventional Gardener website. If you're reading it elsewhere you may want to navigate away from plagiarised content.

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