It’s not often you get to hunt for unusual wildlife in the Cotswolds, but over the weekend Ryan and I went on a dinosaur hunt! We popped over to Bourton-on-the-water to take a Jurassic Journey at Birdland, where they have upgraded their wildlife walk to include lifesize models of dinosaurs along the trail. The point, of course, is that modern birds are descended from dinosaurs, and if you take a close enough look at our feathered friends you can see the similarities (I always thought they were pretty obvious in our chickens….).


Dinosaur footprints

The first signs are footprints, although you may hear also hear the dinosaurs, if they have been disturbed by visitors further along the trail…


Postosuchus

…and you’ll rapidly come across a Postosuchus in a clearing. Given that it’s a fiercely territorial carnivore, it’s time to step right along…


A mother dinosaur protecting her young

…but be careful not to get too close to this mother, who is protecting her young!


Brachiosaurus

It’s safer to stop and stare at the vegetarian Brachiosaurus, although remember that danger lurks in the bushes and in the skies!


Pteradons in flight

In this case the Pteradons are protecting a nest, which you can monitor from the relative safety of a nearby hide:


A Pteradon nest

It’s not just you that needs to worry about becoming a dino dinner. This Stegosaurus family scene looks serene…


Stegosaurus family

but they’re walking into danger!


Tyrannosaurus Rex terrorising a family of Stegosaurus

And further down the trail there’s a Stegosaurus running into trouble, too:


A close dino encounter

If you survive your Jurassic Journey then you can play at being a paleontologist, digging for fossils and uncovering complete dinosaur skeletons in the Dino Dig. And if, like me, you’re inspired to learn a bit more about the plants of the Jurassic era then here’s a guide to prehistoric plants you can see at the Eden Project (who have been having their own Dinosaur Uprising this summer), information about Jurassic plants and a reminder about the Wollemi Pine to get you started 🙂




This blog post was written by Emma Cooper and was published on The Unconventional Gardener website. If you're reading it elsewhere you may want to navigate away from plagiarised content.

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